After some nice juggling by Enschede's Herb-A-Lize It Sound, the stage at Deventer's Burgerweeshuis was taken by the Satta Band, who were led by example by saxophone player Dean Fraser with Nambo Robinson on trombone standing next to him into great instrumental takes on Ansel Collins' 1974 'Stalag'-riddim, Bob Marley's "Rastaman Chant", the Soul Vendors' 1968 'Real Rock' including vocal snippets of both 1979 updates Michigan & Smiley's "Nice Up The Dance" and Willie Williams' "Armagideon Time", "Rockfort Rock", Jackie Mittoo's 'One Step Beyond' a.k.a. 'Bobby Bobylon' culminating in a tribute to Treasure Isle's Duke Reid Studio One's Coxsone Dodd.





Satta Band's riddim tandem

Dean Fraser in his role
of bandleader


Nambo as percussionist


DJ-Legend Dillinger





Dillinger

Dillinger

This great set that had the crowd skanking was finished with Prince Buster's 1965 smash "Al Capone", as a nice bridge to the man entering the stage next, once named Alcapone Jr. after Dennis Alcapone, but renamed by Lee 'Scratch' Perry after another famous gangster: Dillinger. He delivered some great tunes from his glory times kicking it off (pun intended) with his 1976 Channel One scorcher "Natty Kick Like Lightning" and its Studio One counterpart "Natty Kung Fu" over Roy Richards' 1970 Studio One 'Freedom Blues'-riddim. "Natty B S C" over the Wailing Souls' 'Things And Time'-riddim, "Ragnampiza" over Bob Andy's 'Unchained', "Plantation Heights" over Larry Marshall's 1968 'Mean Girl', with Dillinger singing the famous Mighty Diamonds take on it "I Need A Roof", his take on 'Stalag' "Melting Pot", the excellent "War Is Over" over Little Roy's 'Tribal War', "Jamaican Collie" over the Sound Dimension's 'Full Up' a.k.a. the Mighty Diamonds' 'Pass The Kouchie' were delivered with a voice that got stronger midway into this set, but that unfortunately started to get a little less strong towards closing it with his seminal "C.B. 200" over Gregory Isaacs' adaptation of Bob Andy's "Sun Shines For Me". His encore was the appropriate (we were in the East of the Netherlands) 'Eastman Skank' over one of the most underrated riddims ever, Leroy Smart's 'Ballistic Affair', before he went off again, to return to deliver his popchartbuster "Cocaine In My Brain" to close a set filled with hits, delivered in the middle of his set in fine style, but lacking his former power at the start and near the end of it.



Abyssinians

Abyssinians"

Abyssinians

The main attraction of the night were the Abyssinians, who had lost nothing of their great vocal power, and whose gifted vocal harmonies were featured after a brilliant instrumental intro, of course ending in the 'Satta Massa Gana'-riddim with it's first lines sung by the Abyssinians as they entered the stage. Opening with 1976's "The Good Lord", they unleashed their most powerful tunes, with the heavenly close harmonies, dark melodies and rastafarian themes, like "African Race", "Know Jah Today", "Abendigo", "Let My Days Be Long", "Y Mas Gan", "Leggo Beast", "Meditation", the even in this string of excellent tunes outstanding "Declaration Of Rights" and "Forward To Zion", before leaving the stage, and an absolutely happy but still unsatisfied audience behind.



Abyssinians inna Nyahbinghi style
during "Satta Massa Gana"

Abyssinians inna Nyahbinghi style
during "Satta Massa Gana"

Abyssinians inna Nyahbinghi style
during "Satta Massa Gana"

Having returned on stage for a well deserved (both from the Abyssinians' and the audience's point of view) encore the Abyssinians sung the mighty "This Land Is For Everyone", before the Satta Band segued into the 'Satta'-riddim, on which the Abyssinians performed their own toasting take reciting the bible in Amharic "Mabrak", "Satta Me No Born Yah" and their seminal rootsreggae anthem "Satta Massa Gana", that was prolongued into a very nice Nyahbinghi drumming jam to close an absolutely superb performance.


Text & Photos : Souljah



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