Title
Artist
Label
Format
Date

Give Them The Rights
The Congos
Young Tree Records
CD
May 5, 2005

The Congos - Give Them the Rights Track list
  1. It Can't Work
  2. Give Them The Rights
  3. Kingdom Rises
  4. Boycott
  5. Undiluted Soldier
  6. Sleeping Giant
  7. Lion In The Jungle
  8. Mr. Shark
  9. Praise H.I.M.
  10. Capture Your Smile
  11. Born Again
Rating : from 5 (excellent) to 1 (poor)
Vocals : 5 Backing : 5 Production : 4/5 Sound quality : 5 Sleeve : 4/5
Recently it was official announced that the legendary Congos are back together again. The original trio Cedric Myton, Roydell Johnson, and Watty Barnett, are reunited and ready to bring their unique reggae style to a new generation of fans, and their long standing ones too. They are in the studio recording their new album, "Second Coming", due out in June 2005. But first there's this Young Tree Records release, "Give Them The Rights", the Congos' first studio album in 7 years. Actually it's a Cedric Myton album, but with a line-up of background singers and players of instruments that reads like a 'who's who in reggae'. Featured are reggae stalwarts such as Sly & Robbie, Leroy "Horsemouth" Wallace, the late Junior Delgado, Earl "Heptone" Morgan, Mafia & Fluxy, Johnny Moore, David Madden, Dean Fraser, Earl "Chinna" Smith, Junior Marvin, Dwight Pinkney, Gladstone Anderson, Bongo Herman and Flabba Holt, to name a few.
Over three years in the making, "Give Them The Rights" features eleven songs written by Cedric Myton, some of them co-written with his wife Yvonne. It's a truly worthwhile album, that has it great moments and at some points brings back to mind the heydays of the original Congos. It's a joy to hear well arranged and tight played original riddims, and Cedric Myton's great, soulful falsetto vocals along with the wonderful harmony vocals that backup this distinctive voice. Lyrically this set touches themes such as Rastafarian faith in the track "Praise H.I.M.", protest in the title song "Give Them The Rights" and acid character studies of the obnoxious and showy rich as comes to surface in "Mr. Shark". From start to finish the listener is treated to a collection of tunes that keeps him involved. This is first-rate reggae music, no weak moment to be found. It's hard to point out the stand outs as there are so many solid to excellent tracks. So let's stick to our favourites, which include "Kingdom Rises", "Sleeping Giant", "Mr. Shark", "Praise H.I.M." and the beautiful "Born Again", which can be regarded as a genuine classic.