Title
Artist
Label
Format
Date

In The Light / In The Light Dub
Horace Andy
17 North Parade
CD / Vinyl LP / Digital Release
March 4, 2016

Track list
  1. Do You Love My Music
  2. Hey There Woman
  3. Government Land
  4. Leave Rasta
  5. Fever
  6. In The Light
  7. Problems
  8. If I
  9. Collie Herb
  10. Rome
  1. Music Dub
  2. Dub There
  3. Government Dub
  4. Rasta Dub
  5. Fever Dub
  6. Dub The Light
  7. Problems Dub
  8. I & I
  9. Collie Dub
  10. Dub Down Rome
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Rating : from 5 (excellent) to 1 (poor)
Vocals : 5 Backing : 5 Production : 5 Sound quality : 4/5 Sleeve : 5
Horace Andy (born Horace Hinds, 19 February 1951 in Kingston, Jamaica), is a legendary roots reggae singer, notable for such classic tracks as "Government Land", "You Are My Angel", "Skylarking" and his awesome version of "Ain't No Sunshine". The singer made his earliest recordings in the late 1960s, at Coxsone Dodd's Studio One.

Known for his distinctive falsetto vocal style, he sang on many classic productions for reggae producers, including Phil Pratt, King Tubby, Bullwackie, Bunny 'Striker' Lee and Prince Jammy. The 1970s was his most prolific period. He found a new generation of fans in the 1990s, thanks to his work with trip hop pioneers Massive Attack, continued to record new music in the late 1990s and at the beginning of the new millennium, with an album called "Living In The Flood" released in 1999 on Massive Attack's Melankolic record label, as well as productions for Ariwa, Jah Shaka and Bunny Gemini. He was also featured on the world music project "1 Giant Leap". In 2007 he cut an impressive album called "Livin' It Up" with legendary riddim twins Sly & Robbie. He's still active, recording and touring around the world.

Back in 1977 he teamed up with the New York based producer Everton DaSilva for the album "In The Light". Everton was a reggae percussionist who started his career in the 1970s and can be heard on slices by Augustus Pablo, Don Carlos and Ricky Grant. He was also active as a song writer, producer and arranger. He's best known for his production effort for this Horace Andy album. Unfortunately he was shot dead in 1979 in New York. In 1995 Blood & Fire rightfully reissued this seminal set (the vocal album and its dub companion) and after 21 years VP Records' subsidiary label 17 North Parade brings it back to life again, with the original artwork and newly commissioned sleeve notes, written by reggae historian Noel Hawks, and previously unseen photos.

The bulk of the songs of the album were recorded in Kingston and offers new tunes as well as two do-overs of Horace Andy classics, "Fever" and "Problems". The latter is underpinned by the "Mr. Bassie" riddim. Everton's production style, including the striking use of synths and pronounced (rock) guitar riffs, lifts the album as a whole to a higher level, a more international vibe. The tunes of ghetto-o-logy and romance are glued to Everton's distinctive riddims. The album is known and loved by reggae fans all over the world and regarded as a Horace Andy masterpiece, no reggae collection is complete without a copy.

The well-known album opener, the joyful celebration of reggae music, "Do You Love My Music", has not lost any of its power. Same goes for the heavy roots tune "Government Land", an all-time classic to all Horace Andy fans: perfect arrangement with ominous horns lines. "Leave Rasta", with its dominant Augustus Pablo melodica lines, is delivered inna brighter mood. The excellent title track flows on an ongoing synth arrangement, while "Problems" is a splendid roots tune across a steady rolling drum & bass sound. "Collie Herb" is the obvious ganja tune underpinned by a bouncy riddim. The album closer "Rome" is an emotional repatriation tune, a 100% Horace Andy classic.

Prince Jammy is responsible for the dub workouts. At that time he was a protégé of King Tubby, with just a few production efforts under his belt. His mixing style, a severe King Tubby's style drum & bass exercise without deconstructing the songs too much, leaves room for vocal snippets and almost intact horns lines. The result is a superb dub set, an album that deserves to be called more that just "a dub companion".

Purchase without delay!