Title
Artist
Label
Format
Date

Presenting The Morwells
The Morwells
OHM Records Inc
Vinyl LP (Limited Edition) / Digital Release
December 6, 2015

Track list
    Side A.
  1. Try
  2. Swing & Dine
  3. Reality
  4. Trench Town Way
  5. Come Home Little Girl
    Side B.
  1. You've Got To Be Holy
  2. I Don't Know Why
  3. Somewhere To Live
  4. Bit By Bit
  5. Educate Your Mind
Rating : from 5 (excellent) to 1 (poor)
Vocals : 4/5 Backing : 4/5 Production : 4/5 Sound quality : 3/4 Sleeve : 5
Back in the days, when cassettes, cd's and digital downloads didn't exist and your favourite music was only released on black vinyl, it often happened that singles or albums you wanted to have couldn't be purchased anymore because record shops had limited copies in stock (sometimes even only one or two). So it was better not to think twice when they had a copy, because when they were gone, they were gone. Sometimes you're lucky to get an LP after a very long wait, as in case of "Presenting The Morwells", which four decades after it's original release has been reissued by Ohm Records Inc. from the U.S.

The Morwells, initially consisting of Eric 'Bingy Bunny' Lamont, Maurice 'Blacka Morwell' Wellington and Louis Davis (formerly of the Versatiles), emerged in the roots period of the mid-1970s, and joined the ranks of gifted and distinctive harmony vocal groups like The Viceroys, African Brothers, The Royals, Wailing Souls, Culture and Israel Vibration. The Morwells mainly recorded for their own label, Morwells Esq., which was launched in 1974 and notched up minor classics such as "Mafia Boss" (an instrumental - they played instruments as well as well as singing), the anthemic "Kingston 12 Tuffy" and "You've Got To Be Holy", which is included on their 1975 released debut album "Presenting The Morwells".

It's good to have the seriously sought after "Presenting The Morwells" LP available again. Recorded at Channel One and mixed by the legendary Osbourne Ruddock aka King Tubby, this 10-track debut album is The Morwells' best collection of tunes. Featured here are great songs like the lovers tune "Bit By Bit", the popular "Reality" and two killer recuts of The Melodians' rocksteady hits "Swing And Dine" and "Come On Little Girl". Also "Don't Know Why", their rendition of Delroy Wilson's Studio One classic, is worth hearing. And furthermore there's "Trench Town Way" and "Educate Your Mind", which are outstanding roots skankers. Apart from the music, it's also worthwhile checking the musician credits, which will make you realise that the backing band here is more or less the Roots Radics, a good four years before they gained that name and became the foundation session band of the dancehall era. Another unique aspect are the sleeve notes, which were written by Gregory Isaacs!

This indispensable album should be in any reggae fan's collection, so ignore at your peril.