Title
Artist
Label
Format
Date

Legalize Riddim
Various
Friendly Fire Music
CD
February 6, 2015

Track list
  1. Lion Art - Legalize It
  2. Tippa Irie & Peppery - Humanity
  3. YT - In The Streets
  4. Murray Man - Nah Get Away
  5. Friendly Fire Band - Legalize Dub
  6. Friendly Fire Band - Legalize (Max Powa Remix)
  7. Friendly Fire Band - Legalize Riddim
Rating : from 5 (excellent) to 1 (poor)
Vocals : 4 Backing : 4/5 Production : 4/5 Sound quality : 5 Sleeve : 4
Year after year the reggae market is flooded by 'one riddim' sets and to collect, or at least notice, each and every project is simply impossible. And thus it sometimes happens that you've overlooked a real nice juggling set at the time of its release. An example of a riddim that slipped under our radar is the July 2013 released "Legalize Riddim", a modern roots riddim played live by the Friendly Fire Band, a collective of musicians outta Birmingham UK, which serves as a backing band for live events as well as writing, composing, and recording new music.

The "Legalize Riddim", spiced up with a nice melodica sound provided by Mike "Micky Melody" Hurley and great horn parts played by Nathan Jervis, Joel Evans, Chris Holmes and Ian Harper, kicks off with Lion Art, who is the mic man for Jam Jah Sound and a crucial part of the Friendly Fire Band. This fine up-and-coming singer has had airplay for many of his tunes including the conscious vibe of his first 7" vinyl single "Badness" and the ganja anthems "Welcome To Holland" and "Legalize It". The latter, the first track on the riddim, is a solid tune about the medical benefits of cannabis. It's followed by the outstanding collaboration "Humanity", a comment on the shituation of the political system featuring the conscious voices of UK legend Tippa Irie alongside the equally versatile Peppery. Also YT comes up with a fully satisfying effort entitled "In the Streets", a song in which YT looks at street life and the perils of the gangster mentality. Next comes versatile UK veteran Murray Man, whose decent "Nah Get Away" is a plea for justice and a better future for the youths. The album is rounded off with three versions of the riddim, which are a nice addition and good to hear.

Still available, so recommended to check the "Legalize Riddim" if you didn't yet.