Title
Artist
Label
Format
Date

Terrorist Riddim
Various
Ragga Meridional Crew
Digital Release
February 15, 2013

Track list
  1. Perfect Giddimani - Cyaan Cool
  2. Laza Morgan - Anything Possible
  3. Luciano - Danger
  4. Tizla - Emergency
  5. I Shack - Time So Hard
Rating : from 5 (excellent) to 1 (poor)
Vocals : 4/5 Backing : 5 Production : 5 Sound quality : 5 Sleeve : 3
"Terrorist" is the title of a brand new riddim, expertly produced and played by Italian reggae band Franziska and released by Ragga Meridional Crew. This small record label from Italy previously attracted attention with 7" vinyl singles of General Levy, Daddy Freddy, and Franziska on the "Dancehall Party Riddim", Franziska & Freddie McGregor's do-over of the latter's 1982's hit song "Big Ship", and "The Herb" by Franziska.

The "Terrorist" riddim is a powerful full sounding roots reggae backdrop, with a sound that is closer to international rather than Italian standards. So it's not that surprising that, besides promising young artists such as I Shack and Italian female singer Tizla, some of Jamaica's foremost artists like Luciano, the prolific Perfect Giddimani, and Laza Morgan have voiced the riddim.

Perfect Giddimani blazes fire into the riddim, vocally switching from rough singjaying to a more melodic singing style. His "Cyaan Cool", a solid tune throughout, is followed by Laza Morgan's "Anything Possible". This cut is a slightly better effort than the previous track, mainly because lyrically it makes a stronger impression. However it's Luciano who takes centre stage with "Danger", without any doubt the riddim's lead track. The Messenjah delivers a convincing tune in his well known style. Since she emerged on the Italian reggae music scene in 2006, singer, songwriter and dancer Tizla has slowly but steadily established her name with the release of quite a few singles, and then the 2011 full length album entitled "No Rules". "Emergency" shows that she's able to keep up with the standard set by the Jamaican artists. The rather unknown I Shack comes up with "Time So Hard", which in the end appears to be less appealing.

All in all this 'one riddim' set won't disappoint the true reggae aficionado.