Title
Artist
Label
Format
Date
  Various artists album review
The Biggest Dancehall Anthems 1979-82
Various
Greensleeves Records-Munich
2 CD
16 - 09 - 2002


Tracking list - Disc 1
Chart positions sourced from Black Echoes reggae disco, pre-chart & reggae album weekly charts 1979-1982.

  1. Johnny Osbourne - Fally Ranking (No. 1 - 1980)
  2. Barrington Levy - Shine Eye Gal (No. 2 - 1979)
  3. Wailing Souls - Firehouse Rock (No. 2 - 1981)
  4. General Echo - Bathroom Sex (No. 2 - 1980)
  5. Johnny Osbourne - Ice Cream Love (No. 3 - 1980)
  6. Yellowman - Morning Ride (No. 2 - 1981)
  7. Barrington Levy - Look Youthman (No. 4 - 1980)
  8. Clint Eastwood & General Saint - Another One Bites The Dust (No. 1 - 1981)
  9. Ranking Dread - Fattie Boom Boom (No. 1 - 1981)
  10. Michael Prophet - Gunman (No. 3 - 1981)
  11. Ranking Toyan - How The West Was Won (No. 1 - 1981)
  12. Linval Thompson - Look How Me Sexy (No. 1 - 1981)
  13. Ranking Toyan - Spar Wid Me (No. 1 - 1981)
  14. John Holt - Ghetto Queen (No. 1 - 1981)
  15. Junior Delgado - Love Tickles Like Magic (No. 2 - 1979)
  16. Barrington Levy - Bounty Hunter (No. 1 - 1979)
  17. Johnny Clarke - Jah Love Is With I (No. 1 - 1979)
  18. Wayne Jarrett - Chip In (No. 8 - 1981)
  19. Wayne Wade - Poor & Humble (No. 7 - 1981)
  20. Wailing Souls - Who No Waan Come (No. 9 - 1981)
Tracking list - Disc 2
Chart positions sourced from Black Echoes reggae disco, pre-chart & reggae album weekly charts 1979-1982.

  1. Eek-A-Mouse - Wa-Do-Dem (No. 1 - 1981)
  2. Yellowman - Yellowman Getting Married (No. 2 - 1982)
  3. Papa Michigan & General Smiley - Diseases (No. 1 - 1981)
  4. Nicodemus - Bone Connection (No. 7 - 1981)
  5. Dennis Brown - To The Foundation (No. 2 - 1981)
  6. Barrington Levy - Mary Long Tongue (No. 4 - 1980)
  7. John Holt - Sweetie Come Brush Me (No. 3 - 1982)
  8. Tony Tuff - Come Fe Mash It (No. 4 - 1982)
  9. Wailing Souls - Kingdom Rise Kingdom Fall (No. 7 - 1981)
  10. Barrington Levy - River Jordan (Crucifixion) (No. 4 - 1980)
  11. Ranking Joe - River Jordan (No. 4 - 1980)
  12. Tristan Palmer, Jah Thomas & Ranking Toyan - Entertainment (No. 1 - 1981)
  13. Don Carlos - I'm Not Crazy (No. 5 - 1981)
  14. Hugh Mundell - Can't Pop No Style (No. 8 - 1981)
  15. Wailing Souls - Up Front (No. 1 - 1981)
  16. Ranking Dread - Love A Dub (No. 2 - 1981)
  17. Yellowman - Mr Chin (No. 2 - 1982)
  18. Johnny Osbourne - Trying To Turn Me On (No. 5 - 1981)
  19. General Echo Featuring Barrington Levy - Eventide Fire A Disaster (No. 4 - 1980)
  20. Clint Eastwood & General Saint - Tribute To General Echo (No. 2 - 1981)
Rating : from 5 (excellent) to 1 (poor)

Vocals : 5 Backing : 4/5 Production : 4/5 Sound quality : 5 Sleeve : 4/5


At last.....Greensleeves has done some serious vault digging and comes up with an unmatched collection of some 40 boom tunes from one of reggae's most loved periods, the early dancehall years. Dancehall was just what it claimed to be: a music to take Jamaicans back to the ghetto dances, back to the birthplace of all that was great in reggae, back home - where it remains to this day. Dancehall was the swinging sound of the ghetto: more importantly, it was a sound driven by the ghetto's youth; a sound to capture the mood of the day; a sound that took you far beyond the front line. As much as anyone, the new artists were represented by Barrington Levy and the new ghetto producers were epitomised by Henry "Junjo" Lawes. When Shine Eye Gal hit the stores, it moved like a runaway train. The core sound of this new revolution was a distillation of Junjo's production magic, The Roots Radics' riddims and the whole Channel One vibes with Junjo at the helm and Scientist on the mix. Alongside the new stars like Toyan, Yellowman, and Eek-A-Mouse artists like John Holt, The Wailing Souls and Johnny Osbourne would see their careers scale new heights over the thunderous drive of the new dancehall vibe. In Jamaica Linval Thompson and Jammys - amongst other producers - were quick to latch onto the big new sound, while Junjo - well Junjo just ruled !
The 40 tunes offered here are probably the best of the best. Most of them Junjo's productions, so one might think it's a tribute to Junjo, but also Prince Jammy, Winston Riley, Linval Thomspson, Jah Thomas and Gussie Clarke deliver their deadly goods in perfect order. Anyone who is into reggae will be pleased to hear once the seminal hits from the artists, some of whom are still in business nowadays. The list of killer tunes featured here is endless, no weak tune to be found !
"The Biggest Dancehall Anthems 1979-82" is beyond doubt the ideal collection for all fans who want to relive the times when a rugged new mood and a tough, stripped-down, new sound came to dominate the music of Jamaica... dancehall.

Teacher & Mr. T.